• Wackenhut Corporation, 2005

    . . . I have never seen its equivalent . . . a rugged, durable, and efficiently designed fighting vehicle.

    I would like to express my approval of the Lenco Bearcat vehicle. In my roles as both a former active-duty USMC rifleman and Security Force Protection Planner I have never seen its equivalent. Its design and functionality are efficient in every way possible. Additionally, the turret and cupola system is very practical. This system is also adaptable to numerous standardized weapons mounts currently available on both the military and commercial markets. This is one magnificent fighting vehicle. The combination of gun ports as well as the turret system afford the end-user with several vantage points for returning fire against hostile forces. I highly recommend this vehicle and turret system for other agencies seeking a rugged, durable, and efficiently designed fighting vehicle. This could very well be the vehicle of the future.

    Wyatt Hughes

    Wackenhut Services Inc.

    Special Response Team Planner Savannah River Site

  • TPD/CTU, 2005

    It performed flawlessly…and it provided an unparalleled level of safety for my team members, the officers who were pinned down, and the uninvolved citizens.

    …On December 16, 2005 at approximately 10:05 PM officers from my department were dispatched to an apartment building in our city for a reported disturbance. While investigating the disturbance the officers were fired on from inside one of the apartments. Three of our officers took cover behind two vehicles parked in the street directly in front of the residence. The incident is still under investigation, but it is believed that these vehicles were struck by several rounds that were fired at the officers. The temperature was approximately 10 degrees at the time of the incident.

    I am a Team Leader with the Monroe County, WI Combined Tactical Unit, which is a multi-jurisdictional SWAT team comprised of officers of the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, Sparta Police Department, and Tomah Police Department and I was called in and arrived a short time later.

    Our neighboring county (La Crosse County, WI Sheriff’s Office) was designated as a regional host team for equipment and received a BEARCAT vehicle through a Homeland Security grant. We have been able to train with the BEARCAT several times in the past couple months and I immediately recognized that the BEARCAT would be of great help in resolving this problem. I initiated the mutual aid request and the BEARCAT was on scene in just over one hour. We used the BEARCAT to evacuate our three officers from the kill zone in front of the apartment. After removing the officers, we drove the BEARCAT into the front yard of the apartment to protect our team while we evacuated the apartments on either side of the suspect. We evacuated a total of eight people from the two apartments.

    Eventually we developed a tactical plan to drive the BEARCAT along the apartment building, breach a window where one of our officers returned fire and then determine if the suspect was down inside the room. This plan was executed and officers inside the rescue hatch of the BEARCAT were able to cover the suspect, who was later determined to be deceased in the room, while an entry was conducted, and the suspect was secured.

    The BEARCAT performed flawlessly in each of the three missions that we used it for, and it provided an unparalleled level of safety for my team members, the officers who were pinned down, and the uninvolved citizens.

    Thanks again for designing and producing such a quality product.

    Sgt. Christopher Weaver

    Tomah, WI Police Department

  • NPD, 2004

    …I was quite comfortable with the 15,800 pounds of half-inch thick armor plate and 66mm ballistic glass I was surrounded by.

    At 2300 hours March 2nd 2004 the SWAT unit was activated in reference to a barricaded gunman call. Our typical procedure in a call like this is the following:

    1) Establish perimeter and relieve uniform personnel. 2) Deploy Snipers. 3) Organize an emergency assault/arrest team. 4) Establish communication via use of negotiators.

    In this particular case the suspect would not respond to telephone calls made by our crisis negotiators. In an effort to exhaust all avenues of resolution we deployed a portable PA system and tried to get as close as possible without being in his line of fire, so that the suspect would hear us. Due to the distance, in most cases, there was no assurance that the suspect was hearing what we were saying.

    Here is where the BearCat shines brightly. The commander of the team (Capt. Paul Gravel) advised me to prepare the BearCat for deployment. I was advised to drive right up to the house so the negotiators could attempt to negotiate from inside the vehicle using the BearCat’s PA System and also using the (2) 400,000 candlepower spotlights to illuminate the location with a wall of light.

    I did this without reservation or hesitation for I was quite comfortable with the 15,800 pounds of half- inch thick armor plate and 66mm ballistic glass I was surrounded by. It was as if I was in a high-tech bunker. One of the negotiators (former military) , was cool with this tactic but the other one had serious reservations about the risk we were taking, mainly due to a lack of knowledge on his part of the BearCat’s capabilities. We both assured him of how sound a tactic this was and that there wasn’t anything in this City, which could penetrate the vehicle.

    The BearCat also served as a huge security blanket for the gas team to deploy gas safely. After the (5) 37mm gas rounds were deployed the suspect exited the home without incident. There were no injuries, and all involved using the BearCat felt extremely secure in their role in causing the suspect to surrender.

    We now use the BearCat for all call outs from execution of drug search warrants to high-risk warrants to barricaded incidents or hostage rescue calls.

    It is an extremely dynamic and beneficial asset for all high-risk calls worthy of praise regarding the manufacturers.

    Sgt. Mike Levesque.

    Nashua PD, NH

  • WCSO, 2003

    …The guys in the truck could not even tell they went through a fence!!!

    WCSO2 – 2003

    We had an active shooter/suicide by cop suspect in a trailer next to a residence. It seems we inherited a mental problem from Oregon. He lived in a trailer next to his brother and had a domestic problem with his brother and started shooting a 357 pistol and 40 mm through his trailer. When we arrived, he was still shooting, but not at us. We negotiated for seven hours and decided to use the B.E.A.R. as it would be a safe platform to get next to the suspect and deploy gas. Only a couple of problems. A van was parked in the area we had to drive through in order to get to the trailer. Next, there was a six-foot-high wooden fence.

    We used the B.E.A.R.’s winch to tow the van out of the way. Next, we drove right through the fence next to the trailer. He must have thought it was all over as he came out of the trailer and surrendered to us without incident. Not a dent or a paint scratch to the B.E.A.R.!!!

    The guys in the truck could not even tell they went through a fence!!! That really impressed the guys.

    Dave Butko,

    Washoe County Sheriff’s Office

  • PBSO/ERT, 2003

    An armed barricaded subject…came right out and was secured without incident…stated, ‘That thing is big and I was intimidated.’

    …We returned to Palm Beach County on Sunday, August 3rd, just in time to show off “The HULK” for our National Night Out Against Crime Week. The citizens of Palm Beach County are ecstatic about “The Hulk”. A majority have told me that this was the best piece of equipment we have purchased in years. The media has even been calling it “The HULK”. It has all worked out fantastic so far.

    We stay fairly busy down here, and I knew it wouldn’t be long for us to have to take “The HULK” out and use it. On Tuesday, August 5th, we had an armed barricaded subject. We have dealt with this guy before and a few of the team members were familiar with him. He is a self-proclaimed skinhead, cop-hater, tough guy. We came out and surrounded him and let the negotiators talk to him for a while. Then we pulled “The HULK” right up to his front door and asked him to come out. Well as the agencies with a B.E.A.R. already know, it is very impressive and can be quite intimidating. Mr. Tough guy came right out and was secured without incident. I spoke with him afterward and asked him how he liked our new truck. he stated, “That thing is big, and I was intimidated”. That’s why he came out. I only hope they all work that easily. However, I know they won’t.

    Jim, we’d like to thank Lenny, yourself, and all of the crew up there in Pittsfield. I told you when we purchased our B.E.A.R. that it was going to save many lives; this incident was the first. Thanks again to all of you at LENCO for helping us keep our citizens and deputies safe.

    Lt. Michael Wallace

    Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office

    Emergency Response Team Commander

  • WCSO, 2003

    …He was inside for two hours; when I drove up the street, he immediately gave up and came walking out of the house, before I even had the chance to park…

    We had a barricaded subject with a rifle last week. He was inside for two hours; when I drove up the street, he immediately gave up and came walking out of the house, before I even had the chance to park The B.E.A.R. What a chicken! In reality this is what Police Dept.’s need to look at. If their equipment looks professional, and tough enough to handle the problem, most perpetrators will say to themselves, “I can’t beat them, and everybody knows it, so it won’t look too bad if I give up,” and they do give up.

    Tell the guys to keep up the great work; they are doing the best job in the country for Homeland Security!

    Deputy Howard Garretson,

    Washoe County Sheriff’s Office

  • LSPD, 2003

    …went through fences and mud and loaded people from the back of their homes. The suspect continued to fire and eventually fired about two hundred rounds…

    Haven’t e-mailed you recently on our Bearcat deployments but we had a particularly interesting one on Saturday. Sept. 13th. Raytown PD responded to a stabbing (suspect stabbed mom in the throat), along with FD personnel. The victim came running out to the ambulance and the suspect started shooting at police and fire personnel. A police car took rounds as well as an ambulance, and a fire pumper was disabled on scene. Long story short Raytown Pd activated their swat team and called for ours. It was pouring down rain and we had an 18-hour barricade. Initially we had Officers pinned down and many houses to evacuate. The BearCat was perfect for this. We kicked it into 4-wheel drive, went through fences and mud and loaded people from the back of their homes. The suspect continued to fire and eventually fired about two hundred rounds. We were never able to view him as he was shooting from various rooms deep in the house and avoided coming close to a window where our snipers could end it. We did use the BearCat as a gas launching platform to degrade his accuracy. After the second volley of gas, he retreated to a bathroom and killed himself. Negotiators had been on and off the phone with him, but this didn’t stop the shooting spree. At the time of course we didn’t know this. We used the BearCat to breach the garage door so we could send our robot in. We didn’t know there was a car on the other side and the BearCat easily pushed it through the north wall of the home with no damage to the BearCat (oops)! We eventually found the suspect with the robot and ended the event.

    Sgt. John King,

    Lee’s Summit PD, MO

  • LSPD, 2002

    “…We just used the BEARCAT the other night on a barricaded party. Worked fantastic.

    We just used the BEARCAT the other night on a barricaded party. Worked fantastic. Used it to pick up the patrol guys that were securing the inner perimeter, deploy the tac guys etc. The suspect ignored the negotiators attempts to call him on the phone or answer the one on the PA. We got him to answer the phone though when we drove the BEARCAT up to his door and hit the sirens. About fifteen minutes of that and we had his attention. Long story short he came out.

    Sgt. John King,

    Lee’s Summit PD, MO

  • NIPAS, 2001

    …to look into the objective from a position of protection, prior to making entry, is a tactical advantage we never had before…

    At 2300 hours March 2nd 2004 the SWAT unit was activated in reference to a barricaded gunman call. Our typical procedure in a call like this is the following:

    1) Establish perimeter and relieve uniform personnel. 2) Deploy Snipers. 3) Organize an emergency assault/arrest team. 4) Establish communication via use of negotiators.

    In this particular case the suspect would not respond to telephone calls made by our crisis negotiators. In an effort to exhaust all avenues of resolution we deployed a portable PA system and tried to get as close as possible without being in his line of fire, so that the suspect would hear us. Due to the distance, in most cases, there was no assurance that the suspect was hearing what we were saying.

    Here is where the BearCat shines brightly. The commander of the team (Capt. Paul Gravel) advised me to prepare the BearCat for deployment. I was advised to drive right up to the house so the negotiators could attempt to negotiate from inside the vehicle using the BearCat’s PA System and also using the (2) 400,000 candlepower spotlights to illuminate the location with a wall of light.

    I did this without reservation or hesitation for I was quite comfortable with the 15,800 pounds of half- inch thick armor plate and 66mm ballistic glass I was surrounded by. It was as if I was in a high-tech bunker. One of the negotiators (former military) , was cool with this tactic but the other one had serious reservations about the risk we were taking, mainly due to a lack of knowledge on his part of the BearCat’s capabilities. We both assured him of how sound a tactic this was and that there wasn’t anything in this City, which could penetrate the vehicle.

    The BearCat also served as a huge security blanket for the gas team to deploy gas safely. After the (5) 37mm gas rounds were deployed the suspect exited the home without incident. There were no injuries, and all involved using the BearCat felt extremely secure in their role in causing the suspect to surrender.

    We now use the BearCat for all call outs from execution of drug search warrants to high-risk warrants to barricaded incidents or hostage rescue calls.

    It is an extremely dynamic and beneficial asset for all high-risk calls worthy of praise regarding the manufacturers.

    Sgt. Mike Levesque. Nashua PD, NH